The exception is the figure lower right with a crop of black hair and wearing a bushy moustache. Various suggestions have been offered as to who he is and why he is there, but if we go to Stanley's war reminiscences there is one passage which seems to give a clue. He is describing his memory-feelings of nightfall at the 66th Field Ambulance camp when, alone on sentry duty, the strangeness - the foreignness - of the circumstance and place was magnified for him. If I was on night patrol, just patrolling the camp, that [feeling] was all.  I would listen to the [pye] dogs higher up the hill where, in a clearance, they would sit round wolf-like and do their head-up whining, expecially on moonlight nights. Now and then the bivouac glows, one after another, would go out and appear again as one of these big sort of wild dogs passed along for any possible titbits...Some Cyprus Greeks, attached to the camp, used on some nights to do some of their dancing. Here there were jackals, one was loping its way among some low bushes... Everything slid away as soon as I felt I was getting near.....

The juxtaposition
in the painting of the moustachio'd figure (presumably a Cyprus Greek) and the jackal suggests another of Stanley's cameos. Once again, he is not aiming simply to depict detail recalled when he wrote his reminiscences in the mid-1940s, but is bringing back from his subconscious the feelings they evoked for him.